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HomeNewsWriting Lecturer Opens New Library
7 June 2019

Falmouth Stories

Writing Lecturer Opens New Library

Amy Lilwall, Senior Lecturer from Falmouth’s School of Writing and Journalism, has been spreading her love of books by opening a brand-new library at Bodmin College.

Having won a £10k grant from the Foyle Foundation, Bodmin College and its principal, Emmie Seaward-Adams, are keen to encourage pupils to “rediscover the magic of books.”

Amy told us: “It’s a wonderful moment for the students of Bodmin College and I felt very privileged to be a part of it.”

To celebrate the library’s opening, the college invited Amy to cut the ribbon, after which she held a creative writing workshop for the students. Sharing her top tips for writing and being a novelist was a nostalgic moment for Amy, who has always loved being in libraries.

Amy explained: “What struck me most was the thought that had gone into the layout and the contents of the library. There was one particular shelf containing contemporary books that had been curated with so much consideration; it really made me think about the works of literature that will become classics one day and how wonderful it is that these students are able to grow with them.”

“The real bookworms among them will be exceptionally well read by the time they leave school,” Amy said. “I could see that many of them were already so proud of their library, as they pulled out their favourite books and leafed through them cross-legged on the floor.”

One of the fiction books included in the new collection is Amy’s debut novel, The Biggerers, a strange and fascinating tale about little people in a dystopian, future world.

“Thinking about it,” Amy mused, “I can clearly remember all the libraries that have been part of my life. At primary school it was always a real treat to be out of class and choosing a brightly coloured book to be stamped. At university, I would often struggle through the revolving doors late at night, clutching books and a thermos. Many years on, I remember working in a library, wrapping the books in cellophane to keep them safe forever.”

“As many of our students at Falmouth will know,” Amy continued, “after a while, a library becomes like an old friend. Associating libraries with sanctuary is a sentiment that might contribute to keeping them in our communities for many generations to come. That starts at school. I hope the [students here] will treasure their library for many years to come.”