English with Creative Writing BA(Hons)

UCAS Code
Q3W8
Location
Penryn Campus
Length
3 years full-time
Direct line
01326 213730
Admissions
admissions@falmouth.ac.uk

English with Creative Writing at Falmouth is driven by reading critically and widely, which we see as integral to developing your own writing practice.

We ensure you're able to place your writing within various historical, cultural and stylistic contexts through studying an array of authors and texts from a range of literary periods, popular cultural contexts and critical perspectives. You'll be encouraged to integrate this knowledge with your own creative practices, combining craftsmanship, scholarship and technical ability.

Enhancing your employability is also a vital component – 92% of our graduates are in work or study six months after finishing.

How is the course taught

BA(Hons) English with Creative Writing offers the opportunity to study a longstanding and respected discipline with creative and contemporary elements. You'll explore connections between literary and non-literary texts, and other forms such as art, music and digital media.

This full-time, modular course lets you specialise in subjects that interest you. Teaching is a combination of lectures, seminars, workshops and self-directed learning. Our students benefit from a significant amount of contact time every week and the opportunity for frequent one-to-one tutorials.

Course outline

You'll be introduced to key debates in literary studies, creative writing and the digital humanities. Mandatory modules provide a historical journey through literature and culture from the 16th century to the present. You'll learn to make connections between writers of different periods, understand the emergence of new forms like the novel, and the impact of technologies from the printing press to Web 2.0.

Alongside this you'll select from a range of Creative Writing or English option modules, which will enable you to explore specialist interests and follow your individual pathway through the course.

What you'll do

Year 1

In the first year you'll take four mandatory modules that will provide the foundation for developing your skills and knowledge in the fields of English and creative writing. Additional modules enable you to explore questions of literary form and genre in more depth. You'll also examine the role of writers and writing in society, allowing you to make connections between writers of different periods, and different kinds of artistic production.

Semester 1

  • EGH110: Introduction to Literary Studies I
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)
    This module is the first introduction to some of the theories you'll encounter and use over the coming years of study. This set of lectures and seminars introduces the terms and frames of reference that will help you to provide more sophisticated readings of English literature.
  • EGH120: Introduction to Cultural Theory
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)
  • EGH130: The Craft of Writing
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)
    This module explores the practice of writing as a discipline and a craft, but is equally concerned with theories of writing, notions of authorship as well as a highly practical element.

Semester 2

  • EGH140: The Knowing Self: Literature and Culture (1540-1688)
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)
    This module explores the profound shifts in notions of self, kingship and state, the public vs private individual, and science from the Early Modern period through to the Restoration, as those changes are articulated in literature and other cultural forms and practices.
  • ENG180: Introduction to Literary Studies II
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)
    Building on material and skills learnt on Introduction to Literary Studies I, you'll gain a theoretical and critical comprehension of form and genre and its different historical and cultural contexts, exploring how these function as ideological and discursive practices.
  • CW120: Creative Writing Strategies
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)
    This module offers you the chance to study a wide range of texts in order to acquire an understanding of the distinctive nature of many genres, and the creative strategies and imaginative use of language utilised in their production.

Year 2

In the second year you'll continue with the historical study of texts from the 18th and 19th centuries, and focus on theoretical, cultural and political debates, from questions of subjectivity and identity to approaches to popular culture. Alongside this you'll take two Creative Writing option modules, such as poetry, business writing, science fiction, short stories, writing for radio, theatre, screen, and more. You can also choose one English option if you wish.

You'll develop a depth of subject knowledge and independent critical thought in preparation for more extensive self-directed learning and specialised study in your third year.

Semester 1

  • EGH210: Freedom & Experiment: Literature & Culture 1688-1832
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)
    This module focuses upon the dynamic relationship between literature, politics and culture during the period 1688-1832. Beginning with the 'Glorious Revolution' of 1688 and ending with the Reform Act of 1832, it introduces you to key 18th century philosophical, scientific, socioeconomic and cultural concepts, and their influence upon literary developments.
  • ECW210: Cultural Theory & the Politics of the Popular
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)
    This module is designed to introduce a range of cultural theories, particularly those surrounding understandings of popular culture. These approaches refer primarily to the differing and sometimes contradictory pathways by which cultural processes and products are explained through power, control and meaning.

Options - one of*:

  • CW250: Poetry & Form
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)
    This module considers such questions as: How does form influence and change the way we read or write poems? How do rhythm and metre work? How experimental can a sonnet be and remain a sonnet? When is a poem not a poem? What is the difference between confession and voice, irony and ambiguity?
  • CW251: Writing Short Stories
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)
    This module explores the artistry and craftsmanship of short story writing, and investigates various writing strategies and methods that are specifically adapted to the production of short fictions. The module considers the work of various short story writers to assess how their work achieves its literary affects. You'll be encouraged to use this critical awareness to develop original stories within sessions.
  • CW252: Writing Lyrics
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)
    This module draws on media, literary and cultural studies to explore the craft of writing lyrics. What's the difference between poetry and song lyrics? How do class, gender, religion and race inform pop? Can you change the world with a hit song or fool the children of the revolution? What is pop, punk, rap or rock? And how do the lyrical concerns of these genres differ from each other?
  • CW253: Writing for Theatre
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)
    This module will provide a thorough understanding of the advantages and limitations of the dramatic medium through an exploration of the development of British theatre.

Semester 2

  • EGH240: Making Nations: Literature & Culture 1832-1914
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)
    This module is designed as an introduction to literature, culture and society from 1832-1914. It examines the development of the novel as a realist narrative form and the impact of this on experimental forms of poetry. We shall consider 19th century ideas of empire, industrialisation, landscape and gender, as well as journalism, science, theatre and popular performance.
  • ECW220 Politics of Subjectivity & Identity
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)

    This module explores the ways in which (literary and filmic) narratives produce versions of identity that are critically and creatively linked with power, culture, race, nationalism and history.

Options - one of*:

  • CW254: Screen Writing
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)
    Underpinned by film theory and the study and examination of important films and film-makers, this module will take you through fundamentals of scriptwriting.
  • CW255: Business & Editorial Writing
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)
    In this module you'll explore how language can be used creatively for a range of purposes from providing information to establishing brand identity. Business & Editorial Writing examines ways in which writing is used in a range of professional contexts and the demands of writing across multiple platforms for contemporary audiences.
  • CW256: Writing for Radio
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)
    This module aims to develop writing skills specifically for radio drama, exploring the unique potential of this 'blind' medium.
  • CW257: Different Engines: Science Fiction
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)
    This module explores science fiction, focusing primarily on texts published since the 1950s.

*In year 2, one option module can be taken from the BA(Hons) English course

  • EGH210 Freedom and Experiment: Literature & Culture 1688-1832
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)
    This module focuses upon the dynamic relationship between literature, politics and culture during the period 1688-1832.
  • ECW210 Cultural Theory & Politics of the Popular
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)
    This core module introduces a range of critical texts and practices as they interrogate notions of culture and popular culture, and in particular raises questions about the histories and processes of theoretical practice.
  • ENG270 Narrative & Sexuality
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)

    This module will help you to develop your understanding of theories of sexuality and desire, and their relation to theories of form and narrative in literature, film and popular discourse in the public sphere.
  • ENG271 Comedy & Performances of Culture
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)
    This module critically explores the production and reception of humour and comedy forms and practices, considering how and why they might serve as both reproducing and resisting prevailing cultural and social norms.
  • ENG272 Literature & Screen
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)

    This module examines the relationship between literature and film, internet, digital media, and television. It looks at a wide range of different interactions between forms and genres.
  • ENG273 From Page to Stage
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)

    This module offers you the opportunity to critically engage with the products for and practices of the theatre, and how these have been discussed and theorised.
  • EGH240 Making Nations: Literature & Culture 1832-1914
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)

    This core module considers a range of texts and practices as they relate to the period 1832-1914, between the First Reform Act and the outbreak of World War One.
  • ECW220 Politics of Subjectivity & Identity
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)

    This module foregrounds the critical tradition of post-colonial studies, and opens this out into contemporary theories of subjectivity, identity and globalisation.
  • ENG274 Gothic & Grotesque
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)

    This module offers a range of approaches to literary, non-literary and media texts usually referred to as ‘Gothic’, a term that spans a variety of cultural productions over a period of 300 years.
  • ENG275 Representing Utopia
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)
    This module explores concepts of utopia and dystopia through the analysis of literary, non-literary and media texts, from utopian works before Thomas More's Utopia (1516) to contemporary virtual worlds such as Second Life.
  • ENG276 Texts & Technologies
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)
    This module explores the relationships between reading, writing and technology. It examines developments from block printing and presses to changing ideologies of authorship, copyright, politics of patronage, methods of publishing, and democracy and autonomy of authors.
  • ENG277 Children Reading, Reading Children
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)

    This module explores child readership, the relationship between the (usually) adult author and child audience, and constructions of childhood in children’s and adult’s literature.
  • CW240 Genre & Form
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)

    This module explores the relation between literary form and genre. It will also explore the relation between genre/sub-genre and categories which define literary markets and target specific reading audiences.
  • CW241 Audiences & Context
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)

    This module explores the reception of literature. You will explore large-scale studies of audience and effect/affect as well as learning to understand the more intimate relations of address which are involved in any performance or experience of reading.
  • CW250 Poetry & Form
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)

    This module considers questions such as: How does form influence and change the way we read or write poems? How do rhythm and metre work? How experimental can a sonnet be and remain a sonnet? When is a poem not a poem?
  • CW251 Writing Short Stories
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)

    This module explores the artistry and craftsmanship of short story writing, and investigates various writing strategies and methods that are specifically adapted to the production of short fictions.
  • CW252 Writing Lyrics 
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)

    This module draws on media, literary and cultural studies to explore the craft of writing lyrics through seminars, group workshops and discussion, along with individual projects and presentations.
  • CW256 Writing for Radio
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)
    This module aims to develop writing skills specifically for radio drama. You will explore ways to develop original ideas for radio free from restraints such as costume or special effects.
  • CW254 Screen Writing
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)

    Screen writing introduces novice screenwriters to the basic skills of writing for film. Underpinned by film theory and the study and examination of important films and filmmakers, this module will take you through the fundamentals of script writing.
  • CW255 Business & Editorial Writing
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)
    In this module you will explore how language can be used creatively for a range of purposes, from providing information to establishing brand identity. You will engage in a range of writing practices, from features to writing for the web.
  • CW253 Writing for Theatre
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)
    This module will provide a thorough understanding of the advantages and limitations of the dramatic medium through an exploration of the development of British theatre.
  • CW257 Different Engines: Science Fiction
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)
    This module explores science fiction, focusing primarily on a period from the 1950s. We will explore representations of the future and past in science fiction, and place these into a wider cultural, historical and social context.

Year 3

You'll continue the study of literature and culture from World War One to the present day, and choose from Creative Writing options such as writing a novel, travel writing, poetry and performance, writing for the digital age, mass market fiction, and more. These modules take you beyond the writer's garret, enabling you to gain a further understanding of some of the professional competencies required in the business of writing.

In the final semester you'll undertake a dissertation and portfolio module, resulting in creative and critical work that demonstrates proficiency in writing alongside sustained argument and analysis.

Semester 1

  • EGH310: Aftermaths: Literature & Culture 1914-1968
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)
    Taking significant writers from the first part of the 20th century, you'll study the contexts in which they wrote with close reference to other art forms, such as music, painting, sculpture and film.

Options - two of:

  • CW320: Writing a Novel
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)
    This module provides an understanding of the complex task of the novel writer through a consideration of the forms and techniques used by published novelists. You will learn through experiment about plotting and structure, as well as the subtleties of characterisation, dialogue and narrative voice in fiction.
  • CW321: Writing for a Digital Age
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)
    This module encourages you to consider the relationship between digital culture and writing. You'll explore a variety of contemporary digital and networked texts, and experiment with a range of techniques in your own writing.
  • CW322: Travel Writing
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)
    This module is both an exploration of the genre of travel writing, as it is critically constructed, and of the cultural and professional practice and context of contemporary travel narratives.
  • CW323: Mass Market Fictions
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)
    This module examines a range of popular mass-market genres including: romance, detective fiction, misery memoirs, soap opera and the cult of the celebrity. It combines an exploration of popular culture alongside literary history, and the chance to produce creative writing within these genres.
  • CW324: Creative Non-Fiction
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)
    Creative Non-Fiction will encourage you to use your writing and critical skills in areas not normally regarded as creative writing. Areas under consideration will include essays, interviews, travel writing, psychogeography, reviews, journals and diaries, biography, autobiography, obituaries, memoirs, blurbs and introductions.
  • CW325: Poetry for Publication & Performance
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)
    This module looks at the process of writing, editing, publishing and performing poetry. What does an editor actually do? How and where should you submit work for publication? How does online publishing compare to book publishing? What else might constitute publication?
  • CW326: Writing for Children
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)
    This module provides an opportunity to explore the complexities, challenges and rewards of writing for, arguably, one of the most demanding audiences.
  • CW327: Pitching for Publication
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)
    This module examines past, present and future contexts of the publishing industry and ways to present work within it.

Semester 2

  • EGH340: To the Millennium & Beyond: Literature & Culture 1968-Present
    (20 credits 10 ECTS)
    Through a range of plays, poetry, different forms of prose (essay, novel, graphic novel, short stories) you will explore how literature from the last 60 years meets new challenges, while still writing back to, and out of, more deeply rooted traditions and concerns.
  • ECW300: Dissertation & Creative Writing Portfolio
    (40 credits 20 ECTS)
    The dissertation is an independent study of 5,000 words on a topic or area of literature or media. The portfolio is an independent study project of 5,000 words directed by your own research interests.

Facilities

The Media Centre, Library and The Performance Centre include:

  • Digital labs, lecture theatres and seminar rooms
  • Libraries housing a collection of 140,000 books, 17,000 DVD and video titles, and exhaustive electronic and journal resources

Staff

You'll be taught by academics and practising writers with expertise in areas such as screenwriting and theatre, contemporary poetry, digital texts, Victorian literature, Blake studies, the 18th century, landscape and travel writing, gender studies, children's writing and science fiction.

Experience you'll get

  • Workshops from nationally renowned creative writers, literary experts and media professionals
  • Placements with schools, businesses, museums and arts organisations
  • Vocational experience in events management, PR and copywriting
  • Frequent opportunities to perform and present in public

Assessment

  • Continuous assessment with no formal examinations
  • Coursework and e-learning exercises
  • Critical evaluation
  • Final year dissertation and creative writing portfolio

Careers

  • Journalist, editor, web editor
  • Teacher, lecturer in FE and HE, librarian
  • Copywriter, web content producer
  • Author, poet, playwright, screenwriter
  • Work in publishing, marketing and PR
  • Postgraduate study (PGCE, MA, PhD), research assistant

Student mentor scheme

Falmouth's student mentor scheme matches new starters with a second year student, to help you settle in and find your feet. Our student mentors are now on Facebook. To chat to a mentor about the course, living in Cornwall or what to expect at Falmouth, check out the English courses group. You'll need to join the group before you can post.

If you don't have access to Facebook please email your name and proposed course to: studentmentors@falmouth.ac.uk

For informal enquiries about the course, contact Nigel Kingcome, Head of English & Writing: nigel.kingcome@falmouth.ac.uk

For more information about the application process, portfolios, interviews and selection days, please contact our admissions team: admissions@falmouth.ac.uk

Or come and see us at one of our open days