Living in Tuke House, Falmouth

17 May 2022

Exterior of Tuke House halls of residence – shared courtyard
Tuke House_4
Type: Text
Category: Accommodation

Thinking about your accommodation choices at Falmouth University? Tuke House is ideal if you like to be close to the action. It’s just a short stroll from the town’s many bars, pubs and shops. And a 15-minute wander will get you to Falmouth Campus and the beach. Fine Art student Hannah is here to tell you all about her time at Tuke. 

When I first started looking for accommodation in Falmouth, I had no idea what I was doing. I hadn’t visited the accommodations, I didn’t know how far away Penryn was, it felt a little daunting.  

I began looking at all the different options on the websites, googling them and looking at maps to see how far away they were from my campus and the shops I thought I would use the most. 

There were so many factors to think about with all of them; cost, location, room size, and I had to decide which factors were my priorities. I won’t get into all the details of why I chose Tuke House in comparison to the other accommodations, but my three main deciding factors were location, cost and space. 

Location 

In my two years of sixth form, I had to take the bus every day, it was similar in duration to the journey between Falmouth and Penryn. 15 minutes is not long and personally I do enjoy jumping on a bus, putting on some headphones, and letting my mind wonder for a little bit before I start and after I finish my day. However, because of having done it for sixth form, I thought it was time for a change.  

Tuke House was right in the town centre, so it took less than two minutes to get to Tesco, 10 minutes to my campus, and about 15 minutes to get to the beach. There was also the factor of having to pay for the bus if I lived in Penryn, which just wasn’t too appealing for me. 

I loved that I could walk to the beach whenever I felt like it, and I never ran for the last bus after a night out. 

Cost and space  

The rooms in Tuke were the cheapest when I was applying, and they were also probably the smallest. I didn’t want to be paying loads of money in rent in my first year, because I didn’t want any extra stress. I remember being a bit nervous about not having enough space, but when I read through the information on the website it seemed to have it all.  

It had a double wardrobe (which was floor to ceiling), lots of space under the bed, a long table across the wall with shelving above it. Although it was a single bed, there was more than enough room for me to move myself and my belongings in. I even remember feeling surprised and kind of relieved upon seeing it for the first time, because it was bigger in person than in the pictures. 

Moving in: Day 1 

It was about 10:30am, my parents and I had been driving for a few hours, following the strange navigation voice along small Cornish roads, when we finally arrived at the Quarry car park. We got out the car and I was so nervous, at the time I acted like it was because I didn’t know how to find the entrance to the accommodation, in reality it was because I was minutes away from officially moving into my new home.  

Student mentors were all over, they were all smiling, easy to approach, and helped us find our way to the office to pick up my keys and to the flat. We went into my room; I remember it being so sunny and the room looking really inviting.  

There were students everywhere by the end of the day, everyone feeling the same, celebrating the beginning of a new chapter and new friendships all while being a little uncertain at the start.

We then made a few trips to and from the car bringing in bags of my belongings. I was lucky enough to be on the ground floor, so I avoided all the stairs. After taking everything in, we went and had a coffee and grabbed some stuff from Tesco.  

My parents didn’t stay long, after that we went back to the car and said our goodbyes, so they could get back to my siblings before night. I returned to my new room once again, this time by myself. 

It felt unreal, I felt lost. I then looked over at the welcome package I had been given at reception and decided it was time to open it. It was basically a student survival kit, it was light-hearted and welcoming, it made me feel like it would be okay.  

I then went down into the kitchen and met the first of my four flatmates, he was also alone for the first time, nervous, excited, and eager to make a friend in this new place. We spoke for a while before I returned to my room to start sorting out where everything would go and how I would decorate it.  

I left my door open, there was another room in front of and next to mine, soon my new flatmates were arriving, and we were all getting our rooms ready while talking to each other through the little hallway.  

There were students everywhere by the end of the day, everyone feeling the same, celebrating the beginning of a new chapter and new friendships all while being a little uncertain at the start. 

When you’re looking at accommodation, you need to figure out what will make you the happiest, it might be the view, or a bigger flat, maybe you’d like to share a room with someone and see what adventures that brings.  

Day 2 and beyond... 

The following months consisted of cooking flat Sunday roasts together, my flatmate’s grans sending us baked treats every week, walking across the courtyard at 2am with my favourite cup to have some coffee with a friend while we did our laundry, coming back to my own space after a long day to listen to music loudly without worrying about my parents getting upset, being able to turn on my heating and be in my comfiest vest when it was freezing outside, writing messages in our kitchen window that the flat opposite responded to with messages in their kitchen window, and trips to Tesco when everyone randomly decided now was a good time to make pancakes. 

Tuke didn’t have as nice a view as the balconies at Maritime, or the size of the rooms in Packsaddle, or the big flat parties like Glasney, but it was exactly where I wanted to be. I loved that I could walk to the beach whenever I felt like it, and I never ran for the last bus after a night out.  

The people I lived with became some lovely friends and although it was small, the space was mine. When you’re looking at accommodation, you need to figure out what will make you the happiest. It might be the view, or a bigger flat, maybe you’d like to share a room with someone and see what adventures that brings.  

Every accommodation has its pros and cons, but with enough research you will figure out exactly which is right for you.  

Hopefully, sharing my experience at Tuke has helped, and if you would like to know more you can feel free to message me. 

Chat to Hannah

 

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